Canadian citizenship

Acquisition of citizenship

Since 1977, Canadian citizenship may be acquired through birth or naturalization.
Citizenship by land is acquired by birth in Canada, even by non-status foreign parents in Canada. It is also granted to a child born abroad if one of his parents is a Canadian citizen.

Persons born before 1977 to Canadian parents may enjoy these rights.

Naturalization

Naturalization is obtained after three (3) years of residence in Canada provided that the person has accumulated one thousand and ninety-five (1,095) days of physical presence in Canada within three (3) years within five (5) years from the date of application.

Before obtaining residence, the days as a temporary resident or protected person, are counted at the rate of half a day per day of presence, for a maximum of three hundred and sixty-five (365) days within five (5) years from the date of your application.

The applicant for citizenship must maintain a valid permanent resident status and have complied with its income tax obligations (tax return) for three (3) taxation years fully or partially included in the five (5) years prior to the application. For persons between the ages of eighteen (18) and fifty-four (54), it is also necessary to demonstrate a sufficient knowledge of English or French and knowledge of Canada.

The citizenship applicant must not be under investigation or be in detention. If crimes are committed after the application for citizenship was made or during the period of residence taken into account, the application for citizenship will be delayed or even refused. Once citizenship is acquired, it is a right that can be revoked only through a judicial process in the Federal Court of Canada.

Rights and privileges of citizenship

Canada recognizes the principle of dual citizenship for nationals of countries that recognize this same principle. Citizenship provides protection by the Canadian state anywhere in the world, the right to a Canadian passport and the right to vote and stand for election.